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Contributions of Linda Silverman.

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LindaSilverman

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Silverman, L. K. (1980a, September). What is Dąbrowski's Theory and why am I so excited about it? Unpublished manuscript, University of Denver, Denver, CO. SIL/86.

Silverman, L. K. (1980b, November). A new theoretical framework for counseling the gifted. Proceedings of the 28th Annual Convention of the National Association for Gifted Children, Portland, OR.

Silverman, L. K. (1981). A new theoretical framework for counseling the gifted (Summary). Proceedings of the 28th annual convention of the National Association for Gifted Children. St. Paul, MN: NAGC. Note: date listed as September, 1980 in NEL SIL/86

Silverman, L. K. (1982a). Counseling the gifted. Paper presented at the Illinois State gifted conference, Chicago, IL. Audio tape available from the Illinois Association for the gifted. SIL/86

Silverman, L. K. (1982b). Developmental potential of the gifted (Summary). Proceedings of the 29th annual convention of the National Association for Gifted Children. St. Paul, MN. SIL/86.

Silverman, L. K. (1983a). Issues in affective development of the gifted. In J. VanTassel-Baska (Ed.), A Practical Guide to Counseling the Gifted in a School Setting (pp. 6-21). Reston, VA: Council for Exceptional Children.

Silverman, L. K. (1983b). Personality development: The pursuit of excellence. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, VI(1), 5-19.

Silverman, L. K. (1985). Dąbrowski's Theory. Presentation in course on counseling the gifted and talented, University of Denver, Denver, CO. SIL/86. Videotape, ISAD.

Silverman, L. K. (1986). Personality development and the gifted. Mensa Bulletin, (September), #299, 14-16.

Silverman, L. K. (1987a). Applying knowledge about social development to the counseling process with gifted adolescents. In T. M. Buescher (Ed.), Understanding gifted and talented adolescents (pp. 117-130). Evanston, IL: The Center for Talent Development, Northwestern University. SIL/91.

Silverman, L. K. (1987b). Dąbrowski's theory of emotional development. In L. K. Silverman, Gifted education: A developmental approach. Columbus, OH: Charles E. Merrill.

Silverman, L. K. (1987c). Moral leadership. Leadership Network Newsletter, 2(1), 1-2. SIL/91.

Silverman, L. K. (1987d). The pursuit of self-perfection. Matrix: Magazine of Denver MENSA, 23(4), 13. NEL.

Silverman, L. K. (1988). Response to: Toward a holistic psychology of valuing. Counseling and Values, 33, 60-63. https://doi.org/10.1002/j.2161-007X.1988.tb00738.x

Silverman, L. K. (1989a). Career counseling for the gifted. In J. Van Tassel Baska and P. Olszewski Kubilius (Eds.), Patterns of Influence on Gifted Learners: The Home, the School and the Self (pp. 201-213). New York: Teachers College Press.

Silverman, L. K. (1989b). Invisible gifts invisible handicaps. Roeper Review, 12(1), 37-42. https://doi.org/10.1080/02783198909553228

Silverman, L. K. (1989c). It all began with Leta Hollingworth: The story of giftedness in women. Journal of the Education of the Gifted, XII(2), 86-98.  Does not refer to Dąbrowski. https://doi.org/10.1177/016235328901200202

Silverman, L. K. (1990a). The crucible of perfectionism. In B. Holyst (Ed.), Mental health in a changing world (pp. 39-49). Warsaw: The Polish Society for Mental Health. SIL/91.

Silverman, L. K. (1990b). Social and emotional education of the gifted: The discoveries of Leta Hollingworth. Roeper Review, 12 (3), 171-179. https://doi.org/10.1080/02783199009553265

Silverman, L. K. (1991a). Emotional Intensity, Personality Plus column Understanding Our Gifted, 3(3) 15.

Silverman, L. K. (1991b). Family counseling. In N. Colangelo & G. Davis (Eds.), Handbook of gifted education (pp. 307-320). Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Silverman, L. K. (1991c). Possible characteristics of individuals at level V. Unpublished manuscript.  2 Pages.

Silverman, L. K. (1991d). Sensitivity, Personality Plus column Understanding Our Gifted, 3(4) 16.

Silverman, L. K. (1992a). Counseling the gifted individual. Counseling and Human Development, 25(4), 1-16.

Silverman, L. K. (1992b). The importance of early identification of the gifted. Highly Gifted children, 8(1), 5, 16–17.

Silverman, L. K. (1992c). Leta Stetter Hollingworth: Champion of the psychology of women and gifted children. Journal of Educational Psychology, 84(1), 20-27.  Does not refer to Dąbrowski. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-0663.84.1.20

Silverman, L. K. (Ed.). (1993a). Counseling the gifted and talented Denver, CO: Love Publishing.

Silverman, L. K. (1993b). Counseling needs and programs for the gifted. In K. Heller, F. Monks, & A. H. Passow (Eds.), International handbook of research and development of giftedness and talent (pp. 631-647). Oxford, England: Pergamon Press.

Silverman, L. K. (1993c). A developmental model for counseling the gifted. In L. K. Silverman (Ed.), Counseling the gifted and talented (pp. 51-78). Denver, CO: Love Publishing.

Silverman, L. K. (1993d). The gifted individual. In L. K. Silverman (Ed.), Counseling the gifted and talented (pp. 3-28). Denver: Love Publishing.

Silverman, L. K. (1993e). Social development, leadership, and gender issues. In L. K. Silverman (Ed.), Counseling the gifted and talented (pp. 291-327). Denver: Love Publishing.

Silverman, L. K. (1993f). Techniques for preventive counseling. In L. K. Silverman (Ed.), Counseling the gifted and talented (pp. 81-109). Denver: Love Publishing.

Silverman, L. K. (1994). The moral sensitivity of gifted children and the evolution of society. Roeper Review, 17(2), 110-116. https://doi.org/10.1080/02783199409553636

Silverman, L. K. (1995). The universal experience of being out-of-sync. In L. K. Silverman (Ed.) Advanced development: A collection of works on giftedness in adults. (pp. 1-12). Denver: Institute for the Study of Advanced Development.

Silverman, L. K. (1997). The construct of asynchronous development. Peabody Journal of Education, 72(3/4), 36-58. Part of a special issue on charting a new course in gifted education. The construct of asynchrony offers a child-centered perspective on giftedness that can guide parents, teachers, and counselors in the education of gifted children. Asynchrony has a strong theoretical foundation, is deeply rooted in the field of psychology, and enjoys a rich global heritage in the insightful work of Hollingworth, Terrassier, Dabroswski, and Vygotsky. Asynchrony is not a competitive concept or a source of envy. It stresses the vulnerability of gifted individuals, concentrates on the difficulties gifted individuals face fitting into society, offers insight into the phenomenological realities of gifted individuals and stresses the important role of parents, teachers, and counselors in the optimal development of gifted individuals. Gifted children are at serious risk for alienation if their unique needs are not recognized in early childhood and their developmental differences are not supported. Asynchrony offers an understanding of the inner experiences of gifted children and a sound framework for responding to these children's developmental differences.

Silverman, L. K. (Fall, 1998a). Dąbrowski's Theory and the psychology of giftedness. Quest, 9(2), 2-7.  The newsletter of the Division of Research and Evaluation, National Association for Gifted Children.

Silverman, L. K. (1998b). Developmental stages of giftedness: Infancy through adulthood. In J. Van Tassel-Baska (Ed.), Excellence in educating gifted & talented learners (3rd ed.) (pp. 145-166). Denver: Love Publishing.

Silverman, L. K. (1998c). Through the lens of giftedness. Roeper Review, 20, 204-210. https://doi.org/10.1080/02783199809553892

Silverman, L. K. (1999). Perfectionism: The crucible of giftedness. Advanced Development, 8, 47-61.

Silverman, L. K. (2001). See Fletcher, H. (2001).

Silverman, L. K. (2002). Visual spatial brilliance: A Dąbrowskian perspective. In N. Duda, (Ed.), Positive Disintegration: The Theory of the future. 100th Dąbrowski anniversary program on the man, the theory, the application and the future (pp. 231-246). Ft. Lauderdale, FL: Fidlar Doubleday. [The Proceedings from the Fifth International Conference on the Theory of Positive Disintegration, held in Ft. Lauderdale, FL., November 7 - 10, 2002.]

Silverman, L. K. (2003). The new children: Are we witnessing greater consciousness? Children of the New Earth, 1(1), 14-18. "Neither heredity nor environment can explain the awareness, the consciousness of this new group of children. Their heredity and environment are not fundamentally different from all the children we've encountered in the past. Yet there is a remarkable difference in these children from the children we've known in the past. The only explanation I can think of is evolution. I believe we are witnessing the evolution of the human species, and that this evolution is becoming apparent first among the gifted."

Silverman, L. K. (2007). Perfectionism: The crucible of giftedness. Gifted Education International, 23(3), 233-245. https://doi.org/10.1177/026142940702300304 Perfectionism is the most misunderstood aspect of the personality of the gifted. The psychological field characterizes it in extremely negative ways, which may be counterproductive to the development of the gifted individual. There are positive as well as negative aspects of perfectionism, depending on how it is channeled. As one gains higher consciousness, perfectionism becomes a catalyst for self-actualization arid humanitarian ideals. Dąbrowski's theory allows us to see how perfectionism changes in form at different levels of development.

Silverman, L. K. (2008). The Theory of Positive Disintegration in the field of gifted education. In S. Mendaglio (Ed.). Dąbrowski's Theory of Positive Disintegration (pp. 157-173). Scottsdale AZ: Great Potential Press, Inc.

Silverman, L. K. (2009a). The measurement of giftedness. In L. Shavinina (Ed.). The international handbook on giftedness (pp. 947-970). Amsterdam: Springer Science.

Silverman, L. K. (2009b). My love affair with Dąbrowski's theory: A personal odyssey. Roeper Review, 31(3),141 -149. http://doi.org/10.1080/02783190902993912

Silverman, L. K. (2010a). Asynchrony. In B. Kerr & B. Wells (Eds.), The encyclopedia of giftedness, creativity and talent (67-70). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Silverman, L. K. (2010b). Perfectionism is not a malady. (H. Polyak, Trans.). Heksis, 1, Unpaginated. Retrieved from  Heksis

Silverman, L. K. (2013). Asynchronous development: theoretical bases and current applications. In C. Neville, M. Piechowski & S. Tolan (Eds.) Off the charts: asynchrony and the gifted child (pp. 18-47). Unionville, NY: Royal Fireworks Press.

Silverman, L. K. (2015, Nov 26). Perfectionism is not a disease. https://dezintegracja.pl/perfekcjonizm-nie-jest-choroba/

Silverman, L. K. (2016a). Empathy: The Heart of D?browski’s Theory. Advanced Development, 15, 32-47.

Silverman, L. K. (2016b). A Garden of Ethics. Roeper Review, 38(4), 228-235. https://doi.org/10.1080/02783193.2016.1220856

Silverman, L. K. (2018). Curriculum Vitae Retrieved January 20, 2018, from http://www.gifteddevelopment.com/sites/default/files/Curriculum%20Vitae_0.pdf

Silverman, L. K. (n.d.). The crucible of perfectionism. Integra: The Journal of Intertel. Available information is shown. NEL

Silverman, L. K. (n.d.). Study of higher level development: Questionnaire. Unpublished manuscript, University of Denver.  Date unknown.

Silverman, L. K. (n.d.). Dąbrowski's theory of emotional development. Unpublished manuscript.  An early paper, 65 pages.

Silverman, L. K. (n.d.). Dąbrowski's theory research community.   A 12 page mailing list.

Silverman, L. K., & Ellsworth, B. (1981). The Theory of Positive Disintegration and its implication for giftedness. In N. Duda (Ed.), Theory of Positive Disintegration: Proceedings of the Third International Conference (pp. 179-194). Miami, FL: Xerox.

Silverman, L. K., & Falk, R. F. (1982). A study of extraordinary development potential. (Grant proposal presented to the Spencer Foundation). SIL/86.

Silverman, L. K., & Golon, A. S. (2008). Clinical practice with gifted families. In S. I. Pfeiffer (Ed.), Handbook of Giftedness in Children: Psychoeducational theory, research, and best practices (pp. 199 – 222). New York: Springer.

Silverman, L. K., & Kearney, K. (1989). Parents of the extraordinarily gifted. Advanced Development, 1, 41-56.

Silverman, L. K., & Miller, N. (2009). A feminine perspective of giftedness. In L. Shavinina (Ed.). The international handbook on giftedness (pp. 99-128). Amsterdam: Springer Science.

Silverman, L. K., & Miller, N. B. (2014). Dąbrowski’s Theory and Advanced Development: How It Began and Where We Are Today. Advanced Development, 14, 73-88.

Silverman, L. K., & Piechowski, M. M. (1982). A study of extraordinary developmental potential. Unpublished manuscript.  Note: NEL indicates F. Falk as a co-author of this paper.

Silverman, L. K., Piechowski M. M., Falk, R. F., & Felder, R. (1982). Developmental potential of the gifted. National Association for Gifted Children, New Orleans, Louisiana.

Silverman, L. K., & Schuppin, E. (1981, August). Inner conflict as a path to higher development in women. Paper presented at the American Psychological Association Annual Convention, Los Angeles, CA.

Silverman, L. K., & Schuppin, E. (1989). Inner conflict as a path to higher development in women. Mensa Research Journal, 27, 42-49.

Silverman, L. K., & Ellsworth, B. (n.d.). The Theory of Positive Disintegration and its implications for giftedness. Paper presented at Ranum High school, Westminster, CO.

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